Puma Press

How vegetarians get protein without meat

This Dec. 18, 2017 photo provided by The Culinary Institute of America shows a vegetable carpaccio in Hyde Park, N.Y. This dish is from a recipe by the CIA. (Phil Mansfield/The Culinary Institute of America via AP)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This Dec. 18, 2017 photo provided by The Culinary Institute of America shows a vegetable carpaccio in Hyde Park, N.Y. This dish is from a recipe by the CIA. (Phil Mansfield/The Culinary Institute of America via AP)

Heidi Wagenbach, Staff writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Protein House, which is located in Scottsdale, is restaurant most people haven’t been to, or even heard of. I went with a friend a few months back, and the restaurant’s philosophy is truly inspiring. Eat with purpose, it says plainly on the restaurant’s walls. I ordered the chocolate monster pancakes, which contained 28 grams protein. It got me thinking: how do vegetarians get protein without meat? It sounds like a stupid question, seeing we live in a society that is transitioning to more gluten-free, dairy free, protein powder drinking people. I knew products that have high amounts of necessary protein existed, but I wanted to look into it more, starting with the classic basics:

Veggies

The recommended daily amount of protein per day is 46 grams for the average woman, as stated on health.com. Beans are an excellent source of protein as well. One cup of kidney beans equals out to about 21 grams, lima beans are 15 grams per cup, and even a veggie burger has 11 grams in a serving. Even potatoes, broccoli, brussel sprouts, corn, spinach and avocado have some protein in them, ranking 2-4 grams in every ½ cup serving. Your mom was right to tell you to eat your greens.

Also, seeds and nuts provide excellent sources; one cup of peanuts is already a whopping 41 grams of protein and one cup of pumpkin seeds equals 39 grams. Almonds and cashews are other options (especially if you have an allergy), and even chickpeas, which when ground up make the delicious substance known as hummus, which provides protein for the seeking vegetarian. Don’t eat a Reese’s Cup though… that doesn’t count.

Cookinglight.com and prevention.com list more all-natural veggies or plant-based proteins.

 

Dairy

If you’re not lactose intolerant, dairy is such a big part of every day diet, ranging from yogurt to milk to cottage cheese (not mentioning ice cream…). Sure, the alternatives like almond or soy milk offer protein (8 grams), and it’s good for a change of pace. I know I enjoy an occasional glass every once in a while, but still, I’m partial to the original source of calcium.

By simply eating ½ cup of cottage cheese, you’re getting 15 grams of protein, followed with almost 2 oz of cheddar cheese at 12 grams, according to dairynutrition.com. A cup of milk and a cup of yogurt are lower (8). Still, by consuming those three items, say you have a serving of cottage cheese at breakfast, a couple slices of cheddar at lunch with your salad and a glass of milk at dinner, that takes you more than halfway to your goal of 46.

 

Fish

There are a lot of vegetarians that cut back on this item as well, but some diets are more lenient and allow the consumption of fish. Livestrong.com states that tuna has the highest amount of protein, with about 30 grams per every 100 grams of fish. Plenty of other varieties, like salmon, anchovies, cod and even shrimp or crab offer good amounts. Be aware of the amount of mercury consumption with fish and don’t overdo seafood, unless you see food and eat it.

I’m sorry to end with a pun but that’s just how I roll.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The Student News Site of Paradise Valley Community College
How vegetarians get protein without meat