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Eating less won’t help in weight loss efforts

Local+grocery+shoppers+at+Fry%E2%80%99s+on+32nd+Street+and+Bell+Road+search+for%0Aproduce+items+in+the+organic+aisle.+Weight+loss+programs+require+all%0Afoods+to+be+organic+because+they+are+higher+in+nutrition+than+GMO+based%0Aproducts.
Local grocery shoppers at Fry’s on 32nd Street and Bell Road search for
produce items in the organic aisle. Weight loss programs require all
foods to be organic because they are higher in nutrition than GMO based
products.

Local grocery shoppers at Fry’s on 32nd Street and Bell Road search for produce items in the organic aisle. Weight loss programs require all foods to be organic because they are higher in nutrition than GMO based products.

Photo by Lacey Fron

Photo by Lacey Fron

Local grocery shoppers at Fry’s on 32nd Street and Bell Road search for produce items in the organic aisle. Weight loss programs require all foods to be organic because they are higher in nutrition than GMO based products.

Lacey Fron, Staff Writer

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Over 50 million Americans test out a diet plan each year, but only five percent manage to keep the weight off, according to Colorado State University. Although most popular diets guarantee weight loss, people struggle to maintain the plan and stay fit. This may be due to choosing only food-based dietary plans. The Mayo Clinic diet and Weight Watchers are popular weight loss programs that track bad eating habits and create a plan for each individual to limit portion size, fats and sugars and overall calorie count. Each program provides the amount of weight that participants normal lose when joining the program, but why do 95 percent of participants gain the weight back? “Weight loss is 85 percent nutrition,” says Fred Vergnetti, exercise science major and fitness instructor at Paradise Valley Community College.

“Nutrition is always number one for weight loss, focusing on proteins and carbs,” Vergnetti continues. Although dietary programs aim to lower the amount of calorie intake of the participant, popular low fat or low carb diets may not be the best decision. We need certain natural fats, such as oils or nuts, in order to help burn off calories. We also need carbohydrates for a steady source of energy. Eating right is over three-fourths of a successful weight loss diet, but fitness is still necessary to keep the pounds off. Vergnetti suggests weight and strength training, apart from cardio. “Cardio will burn calories, but it won’t keep your muscles,” Vergnetti says.

To gain muscle through strength training, means to actively burn calories and increase metabolism. Fast metabolism is crucial to maintain a healthy body weight but cannot be achieved through dietary programs/restrictions alone. Furthermore, failure to build muscle while trying to lose weight through dieting alone causes an adverse effect. When the muscle isn’t being forced to get stronger, the process of taking away body fat removes muscle weight as well.

When this process occurs, metabolism slows down even more and makes it harder to keep the weight off. “The secret is you want the fastest metabolism possible,” Vergnetti adds. So in reality, less is not more, balanced is more. The most important thing to keep in mind while trying to lose weight in a healthy way is moderation in all things, and not going too much over or under calorie intake.

Apart from nutrition, integrating exercise in a daily or weekly routine will guarantee a healthy lifestyle. Only a little more than 20 percent of Americans meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for aerobic and muscle training activity, according to the CDC, so even if you don’t wish to lose weight, exercising, eating right and achieving a faster metabolism may save you from obesity and other diseases that coincide with it.

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Eating less won’t help in weight loss efforts