Puma Press

“A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

Emily Blunt, left, and John Krasinski arrive for the world premiere of

Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP

Emily Blunt, left, and John Krasinski arrive for the world premiere of "A Quiet Place" at the Paramount Theatre on Friday, March 9, 2018, in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP)

Jared Spry, Staff writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“A Quiet Place” follows Lee and Evelyn Abbot, (John Krasinski and Emily Blunt) as they attempt to raise their children Regan and Marcus (Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe) whilst navigating a post-apocalyptic world in which making any kind of noise at all is deadly. This movie is rare in that it not only does what other excellent films do and draws the audience into the story and makes them fall in love with the characters, but it also draws the viewer into mimicking the behaviour displayed on the screen. Throughout the whole course of the movie, audience members were hesitant to eat popcorn or slurp on a drink for fear of the noise it would create. This movie was a perfect example of what a tense, well-filmed thriller can be. It is no coincidence “A Quiet Place” is currently dominating the box office and is considered to be the most popular movie in America.

The director, lead actor and co-writer, John Krasinski, wastes no times thrusting us into the story. Instead of wasting the first opening minutes detailing how the world came to be in such a sorry state, Krasinski throws us right into its midst, showing the family foraging for much-needed medical supplies as they silently evade the detection of yet-unseen monsters. These evasions includes tip toeing, walking on pre-placed sand and speaking only in sign language.
Sound of any kind attracts the monsters, so every caution is taken. These monsters do not remain unseen for long; by the end of this first elongated scene we receive our first brief look at them. When it happens, the experience is both jaunting and truly terrifying.

The movie relies heavily on the visual. With next to no sound or dialogue throughout the course of the film, every image carries with it significant importance; whether it’s the facial expressions of the characters in duress, a glowing red light or a swaying corn stalk. This film does an exceptional job conveying it’s crystal-clear intent without the aid of the usual story exposition. The movie carries tension across its scenes like few movies have ever been able to
manage.

M. Night Shyamalan’s “Split” is a recent film that comes close, but doesn’t quite match “A Quiet Place” in its non-stop intensity. There is not a single moment in the movie that doesn’t have you on the edge of your seat, holding your breath in an attempt to aid the characters in their quest for silence. Every step makes you cringe, every rare, spoken word makes you scour the edges of the screen for a monster. There truly is no respite for the viewer or the characters in this movie, and instead of being overbearing, this constant edge provides a sense of refreshing drama to the film. You feel completely whisked away into the world they constructed, and that, after all, is the goal of film-making.

Lending to the creation of this ceaseless tension was the fact that the movie was created fairly bare-bones; there’s not a lot of fat. Krasinski does the bare minimum to inform viewers what’s going on, how the characters got where they are or what their goals are moving forward. Limited by the near-complete lack of dialogue, he still manages to compose a story which provides enough information while still remaining quite lean. Krasinski clearly displays for all to see his prowess as a filmmaker as well as actor, proving once and for all that you do not need extensive dialogue and world-building backstory to tell a compelling tale.

Altogether, “A Quiet Place” was an absolute joy to witness in theaters. Although it’s unclear  how well the movie will lend itself to the living room couch as opposed to the more immersive movie theater setting, it is still a riveting human drama/thriller, that draws and manages to maintain your attention the entire film. The movie subtly makes you feel invested in the characters, and care about the events that occur. Films that treat audiences in such a fine way
are rare. “A Quiet Place” is absolutely recommended to all lovers of great films.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Janelle Monáe’s new album “Dirty Computer” feels cutting-edge

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Avengers: a review of “Infinity War”

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    The Nikon D850: an in-depth review

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    “A Quiet Place” is as silent as it is deadly

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Blumhouse’s “Truth or Dare” fails to please horror fanatics

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Hayley Kiyoko puts out full-length studio album, “Expectations”

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    College Life

    American women give their opinions on makeup shaming, photoshopping

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Desperado Film Festival celebrates nine years of LGBT film and culture

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    “Fifty Shades Freed” breaks box office numbers on opening weekend

  • “A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers

    Contemporary Culture

    Adam Ant entertains enthusiastic fans with high energy show

The Student News Site of Paradise Valley Community College
“A Quiet Place” impresses movie-goers