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Blumhouse’s “Truth or Dare” fails to please horror fanatics

Tyler Posey, left, and Lucy Hale attend the LA premiere of

Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Tyler Posey, left, and Lucy Hale attend the LA premiere of "Truth or Dare" at the Cinerama Dome on Thursday, April 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Brandie Bosworth, Staff writer

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The famous horror production company Blumhouse, who has produced several of the best horror movies to date such as “Sinister,” “The Purge” and “Get Out,” really dropped the ball in its latest film “Truth or Dare.” The film, directed by Jeff Wadlow, opened last weekend on Friday the 13. The film starts with Olivia (Lucy Hale); she gets tricked out of participating with Habitat for Humanity during her senior year of spring break and into a trip to Mexico with her friends by her best friend Markie (Violett Beane). The group finds themselves in a bar on the last night of their trip, drinking and grinding on people the entire night. That is, until Olivia’s attention is turned to
a guy at the bar who goes by Carter (Landon Liboiron).

Carter and Olivia convince the rest of the group to go to an abandoned church he knows about in the area for some more drinking and fun. Olivia is keen on going, so the rest of the group reluctantly goes so their friend can hang out with the guy she likes. Upon arrival, Carter starts what seems to be a friendly game of truth or dare. Everyone in the group takes turns asking each other whether they want to answer a truth or complete a dare. Eventually, Olivia’s friend turns to Carter to give him his turn. “Truth or dare?” she asks him. Carter picks truth, and the friend asks what his intentions are with Olivia. Carter admits he preyed upon Olivia at the bar because she was an easy target. He also says he doesn’t feel bad about bringing an entire group of people to the church because he would rather them get hurt than him.

Carter then runs out of the church telling Olivia to tell the truth, or she dies. Do the dare, or she dies. Refuse to play, and she dies. The group is confused and goes back to their hotel after a weird night, making fun of Olivia for making them hang out with such a strange guy. I would tell you why he dragged the group to the church that night and why he suggested they play truth or dare, but I don’t want to give too much away. The group of friends return back home the next day. Things start getting weird for Olivia when she notices “Truth or Dare?” keyed into her car, her desk, and when morphed snapchat filter faced people surround her until she answers. The faces, however, did not even scare the 10 year olds in the audience.

The group starts to notice the game followed them home and is targeting the players in the same order they were asked in the church. However, the truths and dares fall short of scary and are better suited for a romantic movie than a horror flick. Answer truth? Tell her with whom you are really in love. Answer dare? Sleep with your best friend’s boyfriend, whom you actually love and he loves you as well. The rest of the story involves the group attempting to get out of the game by going back to Mexico and tracing its roots, all while the game follows them. This is when Carter’s motive for the church scene is revealed.

Don’t go spend your money on this movie unless you are dared to. The movie claims to be a horror/thriller, but is a lame attempt to vilify a children’s game. Playing an actual game of truth or dare would definitely be more entertaining than sitting in the theatre for almost two hours watching this movie.

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Blumhouse’s “Truth or Dare” fails to please horror fanatics