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PVCC music department host two world music workshops

Brazilian+percussion+instruments+originated+from+the+native+peoples+of+Brazil+and+Portugal+and+most+have+retained+their+original+characteristics%2C+according+to+BrazilMyCountry.com.
Brazilian percussion instruments originated from the native peoples of Brazil and Portugal and most have retained their original characteristics, according to BrazilMyCountry.com.

Brazilian percussion instruments originated from the native peoples of Brazil and Portugal and most have retained their original characteristics, according to BrazilMyCountry.com.

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Brazilian percussion instruments originated from the native peoples of Brazil and Portugal and most have retained their original characteristics, according to BrazilMyCountry.com.

Adianna Bermudez, Features Editor

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Brazilian Percussion

The drums boomed, the bells dinged and the shakers shimmered creating a groovy rhythm during the Brazilian drum workshop at Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC) on Jan. 23. Hosted by Joseph Goglia and Samuel Peña, students of PVCC and other Phoenix residents came together at the Center for the Performing Arts (CPA) to get a taste of Brazilian percussion.

Sitting in a circle in room 115 of the CPA, the attendees warmed up with a full body percussion session led by Goglia and Peña. They stomped their feet, banged on their chests and slapped their thighs rhythmically, ending the beat with a few clicks of the tongue.

The group moved on to learn two songs. One of these songs originates from Puerto Rico. This Puerto Rican song included a chant that the attendees enjoyed yelling out as they kept the beat on their instruments. The attendees were hyper-focused, staying on beat with their unique body movements which included tapping their foot or nodding their head while others took a whole-body approach. The hosts kept the energy high and fun with their entertaining dance moves. In the end, the whole group gave a round of applause and even high fived each other after the final song was completed.

With a few minutes left in the workshop, Goglia expressed his sentiments toward music explaining that music can “enrich lives” and “makes people whole.” He even described how he sees music positively influencing his one year old son.

Peña teaches a Brazilian Percussion Ensemble class, MUP 190, on Tuesday nights at PVCC. According to PVCC’s website, the class focuses on Afro-Brazilian and Afro-Cuban folkloric styles such as samba, capoeira, maculele, ijexa and rumba. People of all levels of musical experience are welcome.

Latin Jazz

Josiel Perez, along with EJ Rodriguez and other talented musicians, hosted a Latin Jazz workshop at Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC) on Jan. 25.

Perez began by encouraging attendees to think of themselves as the instrument. “This is an extension of our bodies,” Perez explained while motioning toward the congas and claves around the room. Perez reiterated that music comes first from our bodies and then from the instruments.

After the group warmed up with clapping exercises, Perez and Rodriguez explained the clave beat which would be the focus of the workshop. The clave beat serves as the foundational core in Afro-Cuban music and can even be found in numerous rock songs.

After teaching the five-stroke clave beat to the group, Perez and Rodriguez encouraged the group to adjust the beat to their personal tastes. “Go with it! Go wild!” Rodriguez exclaimed as a PVCC student played the conga. Other students of PVCC played their own instruments, which included the baritone saxophone and trombone. Perez invited them to improvise with him on their instruments as the rest of the group clapped the clave beat.

At the end of the workshop, Perez thanked the group for joining in on the fun and encouraged them to play music wherever and whenever. “In the kitchen with the spoons,” he said, “or when standing in line!”

Perez will be teaching a Latin Jazz Ensemble class at PVCC on Thursday nights starting Feb. 1. The course will focus on a variety of styles including Afro-Cuban, Brazilian, Caribbean jazz and jazz standards with Latin arrangements.

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PVCC music department host two world music workshops