Puma Press

The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

 In this March 19, 1995, file photo, UCLA's Tyrus Edney (11) shoots the last second winning shot over Missouri's Derek Grim in the NCAA West Regionals in Boise, Idaho. UCLA won 75-74. While Tyus Edney’s length-of-the-court drive to give UCLA a buzzer-beating win over Missouri happened in the second round of the 1995 NCAA Tournament, it had no less impact overall. Following Edney’s dash and layup to give UCLA the 75-74 win, the fortunate Bruins collected themselves and went on to defeat defending champion Arkansas two weeks later for the title. (AP Photo/Jack Smith, File)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this March 19, 1995, file photo, UCLA's Tyrus Edney (11) shoots the last second winning shot over Missouri's Derek Grim in the NCAA West Regionals in Boise, Idaho. UCLA won 75-74. While Tyus Edney’s length-of-the-court drive to give UCLA a buzzer-beating win over Missouri happened in the second round of the 1995 NCAA Tournament, it had no less impact overall. Following Edney’s dash and layup to give UCLA the 75-74 win, the fortunate Bruins collected themselves and went on to defeat defending champion Arkansas two weeks later for the title. (AP Photo/Jack Smith, File)

William Borders, Staff writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In 2017 alone, the NCAA generated more than 1 billion dollars in total revenue. All while their biggest cash cows, the collegian players, cannot make a dime. In early 2018, the University of Arizona was put under fire when an ESPN report stated that the FBI had wire tapped Sean Miller discussing paying their biggest player, Deandre Ayton, $100,000. Athletes everywhere have chimed in from Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76er’s to Lebron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers, but a U of A athlete also has some words for the debacle so close to home.

“I think Deandre Ayton is a star athlete spending most of his time on basketball and not school, so I do think he should get paid,” stated a student athlete at the U of A. The student athlete also questioned, “What they do outside of school is their prerogative and should be able to get paid for that. I’m able to go to school and have any job I want, why can’t they?” As of now, the University hasn’t faced any repercussions since there is not enough evidence to link the organization of committing the crime, however, many questions have been raised. For one, since D-1 level colleges are already paying their athletes under the table, why not just have the NCAA pay every player? It is a fair question that has continued to raise outcry from current players as well as some athletes who have moved into the professional landscape of their respective sports.

Zack Walz, a previous Dartmouth student athlete as well as longtime Cardinals player has a different take on the subject. Walz states, “The college experience is such a huge part of these kids’ lives, and once you start paying kids, you’re ultimately removing that part of the experience from their development.” Walz continues, “I think it’s gonna hurt these kids in the long run.” Paying every player associated with the NCAA sounds like a fair and easy request, but there are many hoops to jump through when discussing the different divisions. The NCAA will not outright pay their players for competing in their sports, the NCAA will also not tolerate student athletes making money signing autographs or participating in TV ads.

An increasing problem has been defining what a student athlete truly is. “I don’t believe student athletes should be paid, however the lines between student and athlete have become blurred in the past decade,” says U of A athlete.
The student athlete went on to say, “These basketball players are spending more time on the court and less time on their education. Since more of their time is spent focusing on sports and less on academics, they should be classified as athletes and be paid.”

The question is only getting harder to answer as more and more students dedicate their time spent in college on becoming the best athlete they possibly can be. But one thing is for sure – as long as the NCAA continues to make this kind of money, students will push to be paid for the work they put in on the sidelines.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    Aldo Marquez, PVCC’s nationally ranked athlete

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    PVCC hosts second debut of “Since You Asked XIV’” contributed by the Veterans Heritage Project

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    Eating less won’t help in weight loss efforts

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    American women give their opinions on makeup shaming, photoshopping

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    PVCC RISE group inspires students

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    The number of anxiety disorders continues to rise each year

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    PVCC music department host two world music workshops

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    Good Boy Daisy ROCKS

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    Paradise Valley Community College Celebrates 30 Years of Quality Education

  • The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes

    College Life

    Attend for free: Relaxation and Coping Skills Group

The Student News Site of Paradise Valley Community College
The NCAA continues to improve annual revenue while continuing to not pay college athletes