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American women give their opinions on makeup shaming, photoshopping

Christina Aguilera arrives at the Stella McCartney Autumn 2018 Presentation Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Christina Aguilera arrives at the Stella McCartney Autumn 2018 Presentation Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Heidi Wagenbach, Staff writer

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After Christina Aguilera took off her makeup for a feature in Paper magazine in the March issue, the audience’s opinions were shocking. The singer took the opportunity to talk about fashion and female empowerment. “I’m at the place… where it’s a liberating feeling to be able to strip it all back and appreciate who you are and your raw beauty,” she said according to an E-News article.

In the past, Aguilera was criticized for her appearance, even being called “skeezy.” “There’s always gonna be those trolls out there or people that have their own definition and ideals of beauty, but I think we’re progressing to a place of pushback and more people coming out,” Aguilera continued in the article.Despite this new story, Aguilera isn’t the first celeb to go no makeup and break boundaries when it comes to what society expects of famous women. Just Googling “no makeup celebrities”, seven million results show up. Why are people so fascinated by this? Celebrities are only human after all, yet when one is seen wearing the same outfit twice in a row, the media goes nuts. Many times, these “barefaced” photoshoots are hardly that, with the actress or singer heavily photoshopped.

Jordyn Kroon works for Southwest Airlines. She is working to become a flight attendant. “Honestly I’ve never really experienced makeup shaming personally. I try to keep my makeup as light and natural looking as much as I can,” she said in her email interview. “ I think photoshop is somewhat acceptable depending on what it is. I have done it before to cover up a pimple here and there, but nothing extreme. There is definitely a limit to photoshopping on your face… people can totally tell, and it looks like you’re trying too hard. I think photoshop can be abused; it gives girls a sense of false reality, and it’s not healthy for anyone.” “Makeup shaming is definitely all over social media, girls have this unrealistic image of how they should look, with makeup and body image,” she continued. “ When it comes to the ‘no makeup look’, I’m not exactly sure who it came from, but I think it’s great… it helps give younger girls a realization that they can be beautiful without pounds of makeup on!”

“I’ve noticed if I ever go to the mall or something in public and I’m not wearing face makeup… I feel so insecure and feel like everyone… is judging me!” she said in her phone interview. “ It can definitely mess with you and your confidence.” Celebrities have spoken out also about being photoshopped multiple times. According to an article on Glamour, multiple famous women talked about how their photos were altered and they think every person is beautiful. Photoshop can prove dangerous. Model Iskra Lawrence typed on her Instagram, quote: “ And the WORST thing about it… I WANTED TO LOOK LIKE THIS!”

Taylor Schwartz is a current student at the University of Arizona. “I have first hand experience with this issue [makeup shaming] because I choose to go makeup free to school and work,” she said in her email interview. “ Surprisingly, my mother is the one who… unintentionally criticizes me for looking plain. I have been treated differently based on my appearance. In restaurants, when I am with my friends who look dazzling with their curled hair and dark eyelashes and rosy red lipstick, I have noticed the server is much more friendly and sociable toward them than me. I have been mistaken for being much younger… and receive the usual comment suggesting that I would look more age appropriate and attractive if I just put on makeup.” “I am completely against photoshopping,” said Schwartz. “… Women have only created even more impossible standards to achieve. I do not think someone should alter their makeup preferences based on the opinions of others. [Photoshop] defeats the whole point of being authentic and unafraid to express your normal flaws… that every person deals with.”

“Makeup shaming is a global conflict… I believe this began once social media was introduced into the world… So many people… use these trendy apps which are based almost entirely on appearance, such as Instagram,” she stated in her email. Another way society puts this pressure on young women to wear makeup is when working out at the gym, some feel obligated to wear makeup. Based on this PopSugar article, it can be thought of as a confidence booster and lessen insecurity, but Huffington Post disagrees, with this article showing how heavy makeup can lead to clogged pores; therefore, the body struggles to breathe while exercising. 

Neda Danilovic is a current student at Arizona State University; in 2015, she competed for Miss Arizona Teen. “I understand why editors might feel the need to photoshop an image when it comes to an advertisement or campaign,” she explained in her email interview. “… Personally photoshopping an image of yourself to look a certain way can be detrimental to one’s personal health… People might get lost in a fake reality when it comes to their personal experience.” When asked about the appropriate amount of makeup and if shaming exists, Danilovic said, “ Everyone has personal preferences and has the freedom to express themselves as they wish. People tend to appreciate natural beauty and might view someone who wears more makeup as fake.” “I have personally experienced makeup shaming after competing for Miss Arizona Teen USA… I had many people tell me that I looked nothing like the final images in real life. The photographers tend to use excessive amounts of photoshop,” she continued. “ The true definition of beauty… is feeling comfortable and confident in your own skin… Young girls look at these images and feel as though they’re not good enough; when in reality, the woman behind the photo is just like the girl standing next to you and me.”

 

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