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Crazy Rich Asians Ratings Skyrocket After Weeks of Debuting on Screen

Actors Michelle Yeoh, from left, Ken Jeong, Henry Golding, Awkwafina and Constance Wu participate in the BUILD Speaker Series to discuss the film

Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Actors Michelle Yeoh, from left, Ken Jeong, Henry Golding, Awkwafina and Constance Wu participate in the BUILD Speaker Series to discuss the film "Crazy Rich Asians" at AOL Studios on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Courtney Bush, Opinions Editor

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Jon M. Chu’s innovative film hit theaters Aug. 15, and numbers continue to skyrocket as the weeks continue. The movie is based on of the novel by the same name, written by Singaporean-American novelist, Kevin Kwan and was published in 2013. Two years after acknowledging his success with this first novel, he then wrote a sequel titled “China Rich Girlfriend.” A week after the film made its debut in theaters, according to an article on The Hollywood Reporter, “Warner Bros. is moving forward with development on a “Crazy Rich Asians” sequel, planning to feature the original cast and director, Jon M. Chu.”

The audience went crazy for the film. “Numbers stand at $30 million opening weekend, and just after Labor day weekend, the film hit a “groundbreaking record of $117 million,” according to “The Hollywood Reporter.”

Critics on Rotten Tomatoes described this film as a “funny, feel-good, crowd pleasing movie.” This was not your typical romantic comedy, but much more of a diverse film consisting of an all-Asian cast, none of whom do any stereotypical stunts such as martial arts. It is a love story mixed with the brilliance of crazy, rich and Asian.

The anticipation by the Asian community was palpable once it hit theaters. Allyson Chiu, from “The Washington Post,” wrote, “Being Chinese American, I grew up watching movies and TV shows with characters who looked like me but didn’t act like me.” This is an interesting review because the main character in the film, Rachel Chu, played by Constance Wu, is also Chinese-American. To be able to relate with someone of one’s own ethnicity in a successful film is a first for many Asian-Americans.

Model and social media influencer, Chrissy Teigen, went with her husband, John Legend and two-year-old daughter Luna, to see the movie, and according to an Instagram post by the model, “I planned on seeing it, making a few jokes about how it checked all the boxes for me (CRAZY ☑️ RICH ☑️ ASIAN ☑️), but the feeling I got during the credits, watching John dance with my little black Asian mashup baby bear Luna tunes, was a feeling I haven’t had at the end of any other movies.”

What really stood out from this post was the gracious moment when Teigen’s daughter looked up at one of the characters toward the end of the movie and yelled out, “yāy!” It means “grandmother” in Thai; fans of Teigen immediately reacted positively to the cultural aspect of the post.

The film was shot in multiple locations allowing the audience to view different cultures and understand how each city inhabited a different role. The main destination is in the country Singapore. Other locations present in the movie are Kuala Lumpur, Langkawi and Penang, and Malaysia. The scenery of these countries are something a movie could not fully show, but it still gave us a glimpse of the other side of the world. Singapore is not a place most movies take place since most movies are filmed at the Warner Bros. Studios in Los Angeles, California.  The location for this movie was breathtakingly beautiful.

Since the movie’s debut, I am surprised I have not seen it 100 times; I have managed to keep it to a simple two. Overall, the film itself is one I would recommend to those looking for a good laugh and a good time. The movie lived up to its title perfectly and viewers are now patiently waiting upon that sequel, including myself!

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Crazy Rich Asians Ratings Skyrocket After Weeks of Debuting on Screen